Rising Rastafarian Dancehall/Reggae artiste warns Alkaline and others to "Stop making music that is designed to drive black people back into decadence"

Reggae’ a music that is said to mean ‘to the King’ in Latin, emerges through the channels of Ska and Rocksteady music and known to be a most powerful communicator of messages and ideals.
Twarnis Jahfori an upcoming Dancehall/Reggae artiste, said Alkaline and colleagues have violated the culture and if that’s not bad enough, his whole movement reveals his ignorance about blackness and even the history of the very music he’s making a living from.
“It has long been the belief that a ‘deliberate corporate decision’ was taken to limit culture conscious Reggae music by taking “Jah’ out of it.” he said.
“I give thanks that the true Rastafarian culture still exist among us and have upheld many of us. Rastafarism has taught me about Marcus Garvey and his teachings which I use to guide my own life and intent.”
Twarnis Jahfori latest single entitled, “Upliftment” best speak to the direction in which he intends to steer his own Dancehall fan base which he believes will increase immensely with time along because “the people need a leader, there’s no leader in Dancehall right now, everyone is on a downward spiral, that’s not leading. One leads by example.”
The messages being sent by some of the artistes are not designed for upliftment of our people and the music.
“I don’t need to call any name for a come up. ALKALINE happen to be one such artist among that group whose music has fallen prey on the minds of young people that needs to be cut off.  My voice is what I bring to the industry and my music will be a weapon against depravity as well as a vehicle to englighten, motivate and strengthen people,” the Portmore base artiste said.
With two new singles, “Upliftment” and “Babylon No Love For You” in rotation, the Jah Works Entertainment Records artiste Twarnis Jahfori looks forward to sharing his ideals and opinions with every opportunity he’s given as part of a long term plan to help keep black history relevant in the minds of the younger generation.

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